Jesse Jackson tech companies

The Rainbow PUSH Coalition shakedown rainbow never ends, but everyone knows that there is the equivalent of many pots of gold in the bank account of Jesse Jackson, Sr. Regardless, it now it turns out he’s going after the tech industry.

USA Today reported Monday:

Desair Brown: Civil rights activists are turning up the heat on Silicon Valley, calling on major internet firms to release their diversity numbers. I’m Desair Brown for USA Today here with Reverend Jesse Jackson Senior from the Rainbow PUSH Coalition Calling, whose partly behind the campaign. So reverend, the numbers show that the tech industry is mostly white male and asian. How have companies been able to get away with that for so long?

Jesse Jackson Senior: The media has not exposed them. Those who have been locked out if not declared they should be let in under some notion it’s somehow Magic Kingdom, kind of economic rock stars. So they have a lot of H1B workers they bring in from outside the country. There’s no job that they do that we can not do in America. So there’s not really a talent deficit; there’s an opportunity deficit. […] This is the next step in the civil rights movement.

Notice Ms. Brown’s question: She asks how tech companies have been able to “get away” with having so many white and asian employees, as if the statistic alone is proof that there is some sort of weird conspiracy to deny black people jobs at Google, Twitter, etc. Mr. Jackson takes the bait and then references minorities (asians apparently don’t count) who have been “locked out” of Silicon Valley.

The liberalism of Jesse Jackson Sr. is one that is favored by intellectual sloths out to make an easy buck or the intellectually bankrupt seeking to enrich themselves materially. As already stated, the racial shakedown is a perfect vehicle for such a thing. In Jackson’s case he’s 2-for-2, being intellectually lazy and intellectually bankrupt.

The line of questioning adopted by Ms. Brown implies that there is no point to digging into the numbers; we don’t need to go beyond Stage 1 because Silicon Valley has already been tried and convicted in the Court of Diversity.

What if Google and Facebook and Twitter all want to hire more black people, but they just don’t have a large enough pool of qualified applicants? These companies are looking for the best and brightest in the world due to fierce competition — hiring mediocre applicants just to get a good grade on some “diversity report card” is, in the tech world, suicidal.

Instead of asking Mr. Jackson how companies “get away” with having so many white and asian individuals on the payroll, Ms. Brown should have asked her guest “What does the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics tell us about the number of women and minorities potentially available for these jobs?” She didn’t do that because a.) Jesse Jackson Sr. is only good at coming up with bumper sticker lines about “opportunity deficits,” and b.) the numbers would take her story in a realm not favorable to Rainbow Push Coalition race-baiting campaigns.

Here is what NSF said in its report “Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering: 2013”:

NSFGov minority science statsOne online search highlights quite nicely that Ms. Brown and Jesse Jackson Sr. are either intellectually lazy or disingenuous when they imply that the technology sector is “getting away” with “locking out” minorities. The fact is that American minorities as a whole (at this time) aren’t particularly interested in pursing math and science — and when they do go into the field it’s in a “soft science” like psychology. There is nothing wrong with that, but it’s not what tech companies are looking for in an applicant. In less than five minutes bloggers can find government data that suggests the problem is a lot more nuanced than the tech-companies-are-probably-racist story, but Mr. Jackson can’t? Telling.

The interesting thing about “diversity” activists is that it’s not true diversity they want. Take for instance The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport’s 2014 “Racial and Gender Report Card” for the NBA. The organization found that African Americans “comprised 77 percent of all NBA players while 80.5 percent of players were people of color.” The grade for NBA player hiring practices: A+.

From a true “diversity” point of view, that is horrible. How is the NBA “getting away” with having such a dearth of asian point guards? Why are there so few white people on the basketball court? If the field of play is supposed to be representative of the racial breakdown of the country, the Rainbow Push Coalition should be looking to reduce the number of black players (and by extension black millionaires) in the league. However, if the NBA’s goal is to have the best basketball players in the world, then it should do nothing.

Perhaps most bizarre about the Jesse Jackson Sr. worldview is that if I came up to his fans on the street and told them more black people should concentrate on science and technology, there’s a good chance they would say that I was trying to impose “white” culture on them. They would say that the history of black culture indicates that black Americans have always been attracted to the liberal arts. They would rightly note singers, dancers, musicians, comedians, etc. as all the reasons why I should just mind my own business and not worry about whether or not a black kid from Chicago wants to be the next Michael Jordan, the next Oprah Winfrey or the next Steve Jobs. The end result is that diversity activism boils down to “I want what I want when I want it.” What constitutes “diversity” is completely arbitrary. When numbers can be used as a racial cudgel, expect to be beaten. When numbers are inconvenient, it’s none of the white/asian guy’s business — stop trying to change my culture, Mr. Ernst.

If Mr. Jackson really believes that there is an enormous pool of black talent that isn’t being tapped, then he should start his own tech company with an all-or-mostly black staff just to prove a point. If Silicon Valley has really “locked out” black techie all-stars, then it has willingly denied itself massive profits. Mr. Jackson should have no problem finding recruits for a new company that will be based out of Chicago.

About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

47 comments

  1. As you see there is racism, but it is not the racism they want to talk about. Diversity for the sake of diversity is a sham, hire the right person for the job. If I cannot play the game good enough they should not hire me, that has nothing to do with the color of my skin. Jesse Jackson is either a racist or he is making issues for profit and I assure you the two are not mutually exclusive.

  2. Thank you for saying what so few will. Why don’t more people call out such lazy thinking and voicing like you have here? It’s so frustrating to watch this type of thing play out. It’s easy to say “Shameful, Desair. Shameful, Jesse.” But equally shameful for such a lazy message is USA Today. I would expect so much more… well, actually, I guess I would not. But I’d like to think we could expect more. So many people walk around blindly taking things like this as truth without doing simple {or even time-consuming} research. And so many blindly walk not seeing how one-sided media moguls like USA Today can be. How great it would be to see them get Jackson’s counterpart on the show to interview their take on the issue. But they won’t.

    1. Thanks for taking the time to read and comment, Georgia. As always, I appreciate it.

      I guess the thing that bothers me is that the viewing audience is suppose to just blindly accept the host’s premise. They’re leveling some pretty serious charges against these companies, in effect calling them racist or bigoted, etc. One would think that USA Today would maybe — just maybe — take five minutes to do a little show prep to see if the underlying assumptions are sound.

      So Google will bring in employees from China, India, Japan and who knows where else, but we’re supposed to believe that they just have some irrational fear of hiring black Americans? Huh? I’m not buying it. I’m sure that these U.S. companies would much rather hire Americans, but the fact of the matter is that these days Americans of all colors do not focus on the hard sciences. I wish Africa would start churning out engineers just to see Jesse Jackson’s face when Google brings them in instead of hiring American blacks. Maybe he’ll say that Africans … from Africa … are culturally “white” or some other equally-bizarre statement.

    2. Jesse Jackson is a moron. He (and Al Sharpton and other race hustlers) often see racism that isn’t even there. The reality is, more Caucasians and Asians are drawn to the technology fields than African-Americans. And indeed, many Americans do not focus on the hard sciences, which is why they bring people in from other countries.. There is no sinister effort to block black people from technology jobs if they choose to pursue such a career. Jackson just wants attention, as usual. Using his “logic,” one could argue that the NBA doesn’t have enough white people, but if you mention that to anyone… the “racism” accusations will start flying.

      “Maybe he’ll say that Africans … from Africa … are culturally “white” or some other equally-bizarre statement.”

      LOL. Probably. Or he’ll claim that they’re “acting white” or some such nonsense.

    3. This also reminds me of how every few years the whole “lack of black people playing baseball” theme is revived in the media when they run out of things to complain about. It never occurs to the race hustlers that they’re simply choosing to play other sports, such as football or basketball. To them, there’s always a sinister conspiracy that’s supposedly “blocking” them from participating.

    4. Carl, excellent point on baseball disparity, Michael Jordan, LeBron James, and Tiger Woods are three of the top 4 (with Peyton Manning) most successful endorsers/pitchman/personalities that the world of American athletics has produced. Obviously 3 out of four are minority; you don’t think baseball would kill to have more American marketable stars, no matter the color of their skin. I say American because there is no language or cultural barrier to, at first, slow down their off field earning potential and noteriety.

      The derth of African American baseball players is because many schools (especially in the inner cities) and park districts abondoned baseball as a sport. Basketball is cheaper to play and maintain; hoop, hard floor, and a ball. Baseball has bats, mitts, and a field that needs up keeping. Football is expensive too, but at least brings in money with ticket sales at the highschool level. Maybe the schools made the best decision with the resources available, it probably depends on the situation- but how the race hustlers blame major league baseball just astounds me. Teams will scout the world over for the best players, I’m sure they’d love it if more came from right here.

    5. There’s a similar problem over in South Africa… there aren’t many black people on its cricket team (or Asians, for that matter), even with a government-imposed quota, and some people have raised hell over that. As in America, there’s no racial conspiracy – people are simply choosing to play soccer or rugby instead.

    6. “There’s a similar problem over in South Africa… there aren’t many black people on its cricket team (or Asians, for that matter), even with a government-imposed quota…”

      They have cricket quotas in Africa? Heh.

  3. To me Jesse likes muscling in on something already established.  When he complained about (I believe) Pepsi several years ago, he said there were plenty of qualified black managers/workers to run a bottling distribution, and I’m sure he was correct in that statement.  But instead of getting investors and a company together to try and secure a Pepsi or Coke contract, he threatens them into giving a distributorship to his family members!

    I really don’t know how tech companies work, it almost seems like genius kids think up these ideas in their basement or dorms, start it as a hobby, and the idea explodes.  Racial inequality doesn’t seem to be a factor. A reoccurring theme is the lack of African-Americans not studying tech or “hard” science; instead of trying to hustle silicon valley for money; maybe Jesse should preach the importance of school to those in Chicago (and elsewhere); he may well be correct in his assessment of minority tech talent, but it will go largely untapped if education isn’t stressed.

    1. This is anecdotal evidence (so make of it what you will) but I went to a pretty diverse high school, and the one things that struck me as incredibly interesting as a kid was that there were black kids who were not in any of my math or science classes who would walk down the hallway rapping endless strings of complicated songs, lyrics, etc. The stuff they were singing had to take hours upon hours to memorize. These were the days before high school kids had cell phones, high-speed internet and iTunes. It fascinated me that they were smart enough to remember entire rap albums, but seemingly not smart enough to be in my math class.

      I think that they were very smart. I just think that their priorities were messed up. My priorities were a bit misplaced in those days as well…just not nearly as much. I believe most people are smarter than we give them credit for. What usually comes across as an deficiency in aptitude is usually more of a problem with prioritization.

    2. I’m sure many of us didn’t have the greatest priorities in our teen years….especially me! But, I always did respect a good education, and while I get “school isn’t for everyone” it statistically is a darn good investment for future income. I think that would be a better example for Jesse to set, as opposed to “tech companies are rich, I’m gonna crash the party!”

    3. I think I’ve shared this before. Michio Kaku puts it well regarding the “Stupid Index” of America. I’d rather listen to Mr. Kaku on the H1B Visa than Jesse Jackson.

      If you want to kill the economy (and hurt people of all racial backgrounds) then stop smart people from coming here, Mr. Jackson.

    4. I’ve seen Dr. Kaku on assorted tv shows, and you often feature him here. The more I listen to him, the more sense he makes about a lot of things. He is always engaging, but here you really see his passion and concern. I found his message to be just plain scary in this clip.

      Instead of “no child left behind” or CORE, we need a new approach. It’d be nice if we could get a commission of some sort headed by Dr. Kaku to see if we could address our growing “stupid index”, I’d be real curious what he’d have to say.

    1. Lizard, I was hoping you would expand on America’s institutional racism and then explain in what ways a young law-abiding black man is prevented from accomplishing the vast majority of his hopes and dreams over a lifetime in the United States.

      Feel free to actually discuss on the content of the piece, since that’s what most people do in the comments section.

  4. “the existence of race hustling opportunists does not negate the existence of institutional racism.”

    But it also does not mean that racism exists in the situation either as we can see in this case it was a fictions accusation.

    1. “young law-abiding black man is prevented from accomplishing the vast majority of his hopes and dreams over a lifetime in the United States.”

      Nothing in 2014 America is preventing that from happening, contrary to what the Jacksons, Sharptons and Lizards of the world think. Racism does not hold anyone back in any real way. People hold themselves back. But they have to pretend it does because otherwise the Sharptons and Jacksons of the world would have to go find real jobs.

    2. “But it also does not mean that racism exists in the situation either as we can see in this case it was a fictions accusation.”

      That’s how Al Sharpton got famous in the first place, with the Tawana Brawley hoax in the late 1980s. As for Jackson, I recall reading somewhere that he flunked out of the seminary and declared himself a reverend after MLK was assassinated.

    3. Another great point Carl, I was in New Jersey/NYC area when Tawana Brawley went down, it was ugly. If its true about Jackson declaring himself a reverend; then both their “careers” were founded on deceit.

    4. the war on drugs, Carl. Stop and Frisk, Carl. the allocation of funds for public schools, Carl.

    5. Young men and women from India and China, who grew up with far fewer resources at their disposal than even the poorest Americans, are somehow able to educate themselves to the point where high tech companies will bend over backwards to get them working in the United States — and yet we’re supposed to beat ourselves up because more minority kids aren’t give iPads to take home to do their homework in Chicago, Philadelphia, Detroit, etc.

      Feel free to comment on the actual post at any time, Lizard19.

      Perhaps it’s time to do your part to end institutional racism by making a donation to Chicago Public Schools.

  5. I will not say that racism does not exist but I will say that it is often used as a crutch or an excuse when it is not present. With that said there is many types of discrimination such as weight and attractiveness as well and yet we do not see much of an uproar about that. Their are also cases of discrimination against white males and yet that does not get much attention (I guess it is okay because we all know about white privilege…sarcasm.
    I have a friend that happens to be black and blind he has more issues with acceptance because he is blind than the color of his skin. People like Jesse Jackson make stories out of nothing for attention and money and it is saddening, who is the real divider here? The very people complaining about being discriminated against are actually discriminating others and causing more separation which gets ignorant sheep like Slott and Marz to follow. This is exactly what these people want as they create more money making opportunities for their exploitation of differences. Why can we not focus on our similarities since we are more similar than different.

  6. so when other commenters start talking about sports, which is off-topic to the content of this post, it’s ok, but if I start talking about the actual existence of institutional racism, it’s not ok. maybe you should try to be a little more consistent in how you moderate your comment threads.

    1. Maybe you should realize that your track record for sticking to the topic is horrible, that you have a long way to go to build up any sort of credibility with my regular readers, and that my patience for you is almost zero.

      Whereas my other readers actually tend to comment on the content of the piece, you generally just talk about whatever it is Lizard19 wants to talk about right out of the gates.

      You are now banned until September 1, 2014. If you comment again before that date the ban will be extended.

      Update: Carl, I realize that Lizard19’s “sports” comment is aimed at you. I also realize as the author of the post in question that I discussed The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport’s 2014 “Racial and Gender Report Card” for the NBA, which would make your sports comment quite a logical reaction to the piece. Thanks for reading and commenting, as always.

    2. Like the tech industry, baseball has been targeted by the diversity crowd; I thought Carl was spot on in his analogy.

    3. Wow, Lizard couldn’t help himself, huh? Getting banned from the same blog twice has to be some kind of record.

      Although it escaped Lizard’s attention, the reason why I brought up baseball in the first place was because of Doug mentioning the “Racial and Gender Report Card.” Seeing that reminded me how every few years the race hustlers bemoan the lack of African-American baseball players, never applying Occam’s Razor: they simply are choosing to play other sports. There is no conspiracy blocking them from playing if they choose to do so.

      The point is, my comments had more to do with the topic at hand than Lizard’s ramblings about institutional racism, the War on Drugs, stop and frisk and public school funds (if he’s seriously suggesting that public schools are underfunded, he truly is living in an alternate reality; kids from other countries only dream of having the types of learning facilities that we have, and yet they do better than us, grade-wise)

    4. Although it escaped Lizard’s attention, the reason why I brought up baseball in the first place was because of Doug mentioning the “Racial and Gender Report Card.”

      That’s why I don’t even think he read the post. I think he read the headline, perhaps glanced that the first paragraph, and then decided he wanted to talk about “institutional racism.” Nobody said or implied racism doesn’t exist, but yet his first comment was “the existence of race hustling opportunists does not negate the existence of institutional racism.”

      Huh? What? What the heck is he even talking about? Why even go there?

      Your comment was clearly rooted in something I discussed during the course of the piece. His comment just went off into left field while affixing a message to my piece that isn’t even there. And if he did want to talk about institutional racism, he could have at least started the conversation off by saying, “Doug, you say that Google, Facebook, and tech giants want to hire black people, but what about [insert statistic or observation here].” That would have been fine, but instead he once again makes it clear that he has no intention of having an adult conversation.

      This blog went along quite nicely without Lizard19 for 8 months, and if he wants to see a repeat of just how well it runs without him in the comments section, then I’m willing to make that happen.

    5. “That’s why I don’t even think he read the post. I think he read the headline, perhaps glanced that the first paragraph, and then decided he wanted to talk about “institutional racism.”

      It’s more than obvious that he didn’t read the post, and being a troll, decided to make the subject about institutional racism. No one, and definitely not me, denies that racism still exists. However, incidents of such in modern-day America are episodic in nature and society has a completely different view of African-Americans than it did 50 to 60 years ago. But to people like Sharpton, Jackson and Lizard, that’s never enough, of course.

      “Your comment was clearly rooted in something I discussed during the course of the piece. His comment just went off into left field while affixing a message to my piece that isn’t even there.”

      Exactly. He likes to cherry-pick what commenters say, distort it a bit and criticize them for things they never said, especially if he happens to disagree with them. I’ve been to his “blog” (it’s more like an anti-American conspiracy forum) in the past and seen that’s he done that on numerous occasions.

      Another reason I brought it up is because recently we had the All-Star Game in the Twin Cities, and in the run-up to it, there was an article or two in which the “not enough black people are playing baseball theme” resurfaced, although amazingly they did acknowledge there was some improvement, but it “still wasn’t enough.”

      “This blog went along quite nicely without Lizard19 for 8 months, and if he wants to see a repeat of just how well it runs without him in the comments section, then I’m willing to make that happen.”

      He really needs to grow up and learn how to behave like an adult.

  7. Douglas, I just wanted to let you know that my business class discussed diversity today and this article was used as an example. I have a very diverse class and they all agreed that this situation is a joke. We understand that racism exists but they also realize how some use it as a tool for profit.

    It was a great discussion!

    1. The interesting part is that the whole class agreed that there is racism today but it is exploited and it is not as bad as the media makes it out to be. This was a truly diverse class 5 black males, 2 black female, 4 white males, 5 white females, 1 Latino female, 1 Asian male. It was a small class but it was a great discussion. We mentioned other issues such as weight and attractiveness as well. I was surprised that the class did not stick up for Jesse Jackson, in fact some of the black students said that he made them look bad and they wished he would stop creating more separation.

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